High tech, people-friendly, outpatient TMS

Australia’s first multi-clinic network tooffer navigated TMS treatment

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Our aim to be Australia’s most peoplecentric mental health network. What does that mean? It means that with everydecision we make we think about how it will make your journey with us better.It means we take pride in our service ­ – so much so that we are the firstAustralian clinic network to invest in innovative, computer navigated TMS ateach of ours sites. We are one of Australia’s most experienced TMS teams, havea great culture & will do everything we can to make your TMS treatment simpleand effective.

High tech, people-friendly, outpatient TMS

Australia’s first network to offer
navigated TMS treatment

Learn more

Our aim is to be Australia's most people-focussed mental health network. We have one of the country's most experienced TMS teams and patient experience is our top priority. We take pride in our service, being the first clinic network to invest in computer navigated TMS at each site and will do everything we can to make your treatment journey simple, safe & effective.

TMS treatment is more than twice as effective as a third antidepressant without serious side effects¹²

58%
37%
TMS
13%
14%
3rd Antidepressant
Response
Remission
Rush 2006, Carpenter 2012
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Patient-Focused

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1. Rush, A. John, et al. "Acute and longer-termoutcomes in depressed outpatients requiring one or several treatment steps: aSTAR* D report." American Journal of Psychiatry16 3.11 (2006):1905-1917. 2. Carpenter,L. L., 1. Malhi, G. S., Bassett, D., Boyce, P., Bryant, R., Fitzgerald, P. B., Fritz, K., ... & Singh, A. B. (2015). Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for mood disorders. Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 49(12), 1087-1206. 2. Rush, A. John, et al. "Acute and longer-term outcomes in depressed outpatients requiring one or several treatment steps: a STAR* D report." American Journal of Psychiatry163.11 (2006): 1905-1917. 3. Carpenter, L. L., Janicak, P. G., Aaronson, S. T., Boyadjis, T., Brock, D. G., Cook, I. A., ... & Demitrack, M. A. (2012). Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for major depression: a multisite, naturalistic, observation nal study of acute treatment outcomes in clinical practice. Depression and anxiety, 29(7), 587-596. 4. Rossi, S., Hallett, M., Rossini, P. M., Pascual-Leone, A., & Safety of TMS Consensus Group. (2009). Safety, ethical considerations, and application guidelines for the use of transcranial magnetic stimulation in clinical practice and research. Clinical neurophysiology, 120(12), 2008-2039. 5. Stultz, D. J., Osburn, S., Burns, T., Pawlowska-Wajswol, S., & Walton, R. (2020). Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) Safety with Respect to Seizures: A Literature Review. Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, 16, 2989Janicak, P. G., Aaronson, S. T., Boyadjis, T., Brock, D. G., Cook, I.A., ... & Demitrack, M. A. (2012). Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for major depression: a multisite, naturalistic, observational study of acute treatment outcomes in clinical practice. Depression and anxiety, 29(7),587-596.